Quantcast
  Facebook Connect Twitter Connect RSS Feeds
  • Brands
  • Search
  • Contact
Facebook Shares Server Information With The World

Facebook is opening its datacenter design and sharing everything from the manufacturer, make, and model of the servers that keep Facebook online and available 24/7 to how the datacenter is powered and cooled to keep those servers running smoothly. Facebook’s initiative is to give fans a clear picture of what it takes to run the servers as well as giving people who work in corporate IT an idea of the kind of power it takes to run a massive website such as Facebook. Given CEO Zuckerberg’s relationship with President Obama, we can speculate that Obama had some influence in regards to transparency.

If you’re interested in IT or just want to hear how Facebook’s operates, listen up! Facebook’s servers are made of mostly Rackable Systems, these are custom designed and custom built servers that go beyond the capacity of a standard 42 unit rack. Facebook is also working with the company to build custom Intel and AMD-based servers that are modular and have swappable components. The company’s servers snap together using clips and holes rather than screws and bolts. The racks make use of 1.2 mm zinc plating that feature no logos or branding.

The company runs on a mixture of Intel Xeon 5500 (not pictured) and 5600 quad-core processors, as well as AMD 8 and 12-core processors. The servers also have switchable, dual-mode power supplies that draw A/C and D/C power. The datacenter servers are designed to be modular and environmentally friendly. The company’s datacenter design is also open to the public and shows the power and cooling designs of its racks and cabinets, battery backups, and motion sensitive LED lighting in the datacenter that lights up only when it detects technicians. Facebook also uses the warm air piped out of the datacenter to heat their offices and the outside air when it’s too cold. Facebook hopes that other businesses build energy-efficient technology infrastructure.


Photo Courtesy of Mark Hoekstra
Photo Courtesy of Mark Hoekstra
Photo Courtesy of pshab