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Articles tagged with: data leak

AT&T Leak: iPad 3 Will Feature Long Term Evolution

Okay, so I am sure I am not the only one who was annoyed when LulzSec & Co. hacked all the major gaming networks and companies. Well, finally there is a leak that sparked some curiosity. Now, don’t get me wrong here, I do not condone hacks, but there has been a huge leak from telecom giant AT&T and I had to post it.

Of the latest hacks to be leaked before LulzSec decided to “throw in the towel“, it appears that AT&T plans on rolling out out an iPad with LTE (the ultra fast Internet successor to 3G).

Paypal Sues Google For Stolen Trade Secrets

Google announced their new mobile payment system, based on NFC technologies that allows cellphone users to tap their phone to pay for things. People call it a mobile e-wallet because you no longer have to whip out your wallet, unfold it, and look for the appropriate tender. Instead, users just need to tap their phone to a mobile e-reader and the credit card is charged automatically. It’s faster, more efficient, and more fun to use.

Sounds like a dream come true, right? Well it looks like Paypal isn’t too happy about Google’s big announcement as they are filing a lawsuit against Google in California Superior Court. Claiming that a former PayPal exec (and now Google employee) leaked certain trade secrets.

Dropbox Can Access Your Files

It looks like Dropbox has deceived users about the security and encryption of its services in order to give them a boost. The FTC complaint filed against Dropbox for telling users that their files were completely encrypted and that Dropbox employees could not see the contents of the file. Contrary to what Dropbox was saying, Christopher Sohoian, a PhD student published data last month showing that Dropbox could see the contents of the files, putting users at risk of government searches, nosy Dropbox employees, and companies looking to slam individuals with copyright infringement issues.

LastPass Gives Breakdown On Possible Hack

A popular third-party password manager, LastPass had recently revealed that it may have been hacked and that some e-mail usernames and passwords were probably stolen. Seth Rosenblatt from Cnet discusses the recent situation with LastPass. Rosenblatt states that people use third-party password managers is because the 256-bit AES encryption it offers is sufficient to keep passwords safe and it makes computing a whole lot easier for some of us who have more difficult and more varied passwords for our different applications and websites.

First Dynamic Firewall For Android, WhisperMonitor

There have been an increasing number of attempts of malware available to Android users. A lot of these applications are disguised as free apps and even if these apps have a five star rating, a low number of ratings can be an indicator that the app you are about to download is malware. That said, Moxie Marlinspike released the first dynamic Android firewall today called WhisperMonitor.

The firewall was specifically designed for Android phones and monitors all outbound connection attempts by installed applications and the operating system.

Mac OS No Longer “Bulletproof”

InfoWorld’s Security Adviser Roger Grimes has argued that “obscurity is the greatest security defense a platform can have” and notes that Windows and Internet Explorer have been hit more successfully than Mac or Safari. Grimes notes that even when MacSweeper (malware that had targeted the Mac) was novel, the Mac OS had proven to be nearly bulletproof. Unfortunately, as many experts have predicted, Mac specific malware has become more and more common.

iPhone And iPad Records Locations And Timestamps In Unencrypted File

According to Radar.Oreilly, the new iOS software installed on your iPhone or 3G iPad, regularly records the position of your device into a hidden file. This data stores a comprehensive list of locations and time stamps in a database. To add to the mystery, the file lacks any sort of encryption or protection, leaving the sensitive data at risk to be seen by other individuals. It is unclear what Apple is doing with the information or whether they even know about it. I believe it may be used in the event of a theft, but this is just a guess.