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Articles tagged with: english

Tutorspree Adapts To Users’ Needs, Rolls Out Improved Find Feature

If you haven’t already heard about Tutorspree, you may be missing out! Tutorspree is a great way to find the best qualified tutors in your area, without worrying about all the hassles that come with meeting with a new tutor.

For example, when a user registers with Tutorspree, he or she inputs their financial information in the company’s database, and Tutorspree pays the tutor directly after the tutoring session has taken place, making sure that everything went as planned.

Baidu, Microsoft Team Up For English Search In China

Google Inc may face a new challenge in China as Microsoft Corp, its main rival in the United States, and Baidu Inc, China’s biggest search engine, are joining forces against it in the world’s largest Internet market.

Baidu, China’s biggest search engine by revenue, on Monday announced a partnership with Microsoft that would allow its users to see English-language search results generated by Bing, the US company’s search engine.No financial considerations were involved in the deal, which will see Bing’s search results labeled and integrated into Baidu’s search results from later this year.

Netflix Sued By National Association Of The Deaf

Netflix has been sued by the National Association of the Deaf for failing to offer closed-captioning on “enough” of its streaming content. In a lawsuit that was filed last Thursday, the NAD claims that Netflix is in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing captions for most of its “Watch Instantly” streamed movies and TV shows.

The NAD claims that they are standing up for the 36 million Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing, and that the deaf community has already sent letters, blogs, and petitions urging the site to provide equal access to its content.

WTF?: Oxford English Dictionary Adds LOL, OMG, FYI

The Oxford English Dictionary will now include LOL, OMG, and FYI, a sign of the internet and texting’s effect on language.

Interestingly enough, the OED acknowledge the irony most of us use with such abbreviations, saying on their site, “The intention is usually to signal an informal, gossipy mode of expression, and perhaps parody the level of unreflective enthusiasm or overstatement that can sometimes appear in online discourse, while at the same time marking oneself as an ‘insider’ au fait with the forms of expression associated with the latest technology.” That “latest technology” at the end does sound a bit pedantic, but the rest pretty accurately describes my use of LOL