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Articles tagged with: information leak

Paypal Sues Google For Stolen Trade Secrets

Google announced their new mobile payment system, based on NFC technologies that allows cellphone users to tap their phone to pay for things. People call it a mobile e-wallet because you no longer have to whip out your wallet, unfold it, and look for the appropriate tender. Instead, users just need to tap their phone to a mobile e-reader and the credit card is charged automatically. It’s faster, more efficient, and more fun to use.

Sounds like a dream come true, right? Well it looks like Paypal isn’t too happy about Google’s big announcement as they are filing a lawsuit against Google in California Superior Court. Claiming that a former PayPal exec (and now Google employee) leaked certain trade secrets.

Obama Reserves Right To Bomb Hackers

Has our President been hanging around with George Bush a bit much lately? One may guess that based on what Obama has recently said. In a personal foreword (link to webpage with PDF) to document International Strategy for Cyberspace, the President claimed that the country would preserve the character of cyberspace and reduce the threats faced. President O-bomb-a reserves the right to take military action against cyber-terrorists who attempt to hack into the U.S. government.

Dropbox Can Access Your Files

It looks like Dropbox has deceived users about the security and encryption of its services in order to give them a boost. The FTC complaint filed against Dropbox for telling users that their files were completely encrypted and that Dropbox employees could not see the contents of the file. Contrary to what Dropbox was saying, Christopher Sohoian, a PhD student published data last month showing that Dropbox could see the contents of the files, putting users at risk of government searches, nosy Dropbox employees, and companies looking to slam individuals with copyright infringement issues.

WikiLeaks Threatens $20M Fine On Unpublished Leaks

Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, is now making his associates sign a nondisclosure agreement that asserts the organization’s leaked material is solely the property of the organization. The agreement states “You accept and agree that the information disclosed, or to be disclosed to you pursuant to this agreement is, by its nature, valuable proprietary commercial information…the misuse or unauthorized disclosure of which would be likely to cause us considerable damage.”

LastPass Gives Breakdown On Possible Hack

A popular third-party password manager, LastPass had recently revealed that it may have been hacked and that some e-mail usernames and passwords were probably stolen. Seth Rosenblatt from Cnet discusses the recent situation with LastPass. Rosenblatt states that people use third-party password managers is because the 256-bit AES encryption it offers is sufficient to keep passwords safe and it makes computing a whole lot easier for some of us who have more difficult and more varied passwords for our different applications and websites.

Google Shells Out 16K To Fix Bugs

We just got news today that Google had paid out a record $16,500 to developers in order to plug 27 Chrome Web browser vulnerabilities, and paving the way for Chrome 11’s launch. Chrome 11 includes a few perks such as speech input translation in addition to a stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. The patches were fixed after the Chromium development community members found a bunch of flaws with the latest application. 18 of these holes were rated “high”, 6 of them were rated “medium”, and three were considered low risk. Google rewarded most of the individuals for their discoveries. Google paid between $500 and $3,000 for vulnerabilities such as: