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Articles tagged with: interactive advertising

Advertising Startup, TellApart, Raises $13M Funding

An advertising startup that uses a pay-for-performance model, called TellApart, announced today that is has successfully raised $13 million in Series B funding led by Bain Capital, which brought the total amount raised to nearly $18 million.

The company was founded by two former Google product engineers, Josh McFarland and Mark Ayzenshtat. TellApart assigns a Customer Quality Score to each individual customer, based on the customer’s onsite behavior patterns (products viewed, items purchased, etc.). The data is then compiled into a CQScore that distinguishes high value customers from ordinary customers, hence the name, TellApart.

Best Buy Furious At Newegg’s Marketing

Best Buy recently sent online electronics manufacturer, Newegg, a cease and desist letter, citing that Newegg stole Best Buy’s Geek Squad logo and made of Best Buy in a commercial (shown top). If you ask me, a power button symbol as an O isn’t clever enough to be trademarked by anyone.

Not to mention that Best Buy’s logo has a tie on its power button and Newegg doesn’t. As for the commercial, I agree that Newegg was probably making fun of Best Buy employees in a generic sort of way, but this kind of stuff happens ALL the time with competitors. Hello? Ever heard of the “Mac vs. PC” campaign Apple spun way back when? Did Microsoft cry about it? No. They countered the ads showing a racially and socioeconomically diverse group, all claiming that they were a PC.

Intel’s Machine Designed For Interactive Advertising

Intel has big plans on bringing a technology similar to Microsoft’s Kinect, but aimed at the business market, rather than gaming. Intel wants to focus their technology on interactive advertising. At the recent Computex, we see a prototype creation on display that demonstrates the concept.

Essentially, a sensor tracks the user and allows him or her to control what is displayed on the screen. On example of this technology would be to scroll through a list of products, while individual products that catch the viewer’s eye can be pulled up and brought into greater detail by hovering over the item.