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Articles tagged with: Internet Explorer

YouTube Delivers Creative Commons Library

Youtube has just delivered a Creative Commons license that allows creators to reuse and remake their favorite content, with ease. With the new copyright license from Creative Commons, licensors will be able to keep the copyright while letting others copy, distribute, and re-use the work for non-commercial purposes.

This will make it perfectly legal to remix clips and videos that are tagged with the Creative Commons license. The only requirement is that the original creator gets credited at some point in the video.

HTC Desire With Linux Ubuntu Installed!

If you loved every bit of the HTC Desire, but were hoping for something more ‘desktop-y’, a guy named Bergfex from XDA developers, got the Android phone to boot to Linux Ubuntu, natively. To do the hack, the user must put zip files in specified places (such as the root of one’s SD card and on the desktop). The phone must then be put into bootloader mode. The user is then required to connect his or her phone into a desktop computer and restart it to get the old ROM loading.

So you may be asking, well how does Ubuntu work on a phone, is it buggy?

Google Tells Users To Use Outdated Browsers

Google told Chrome users earlier in the week to switch to outdated versions of Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox if they want to access Gmail when they are not connected to the web. On Tuesday, Google dropped offline support for Chrome, IE9, Firefox 4, Safari, and Opera. What’s the big reason? Google’s conversion to HTML5 this summer.

Google currently uses an old plug-in called Gears and the company feels it is time to keep up with technology (especially considering they are a seen as a founding father of technology). The current version of Chrome 11 is considered stable and doesn’t run Gmail in offline mode either.

Microsoft’s IE Threat: Cookie Jacking

A computer security firm has found a flaw in Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser that allows hackers to steal credentials to access Facebook, Twitter, and other websites. The technique is called cookiejacking, an abbreviated form of cookie-hijacking. Once the hacker has the cookie, he or she can use it to gain access to the same website.

The vulnerability currently affects all versions of Internet Explorer on every version of Windows operating system. Hackers can exploit the flaw to access a data file, called a cookie, that holds the login name and password to a web account.

Google Works On Addiction To Adobe Flash

Google announced yesterday that it has added Flash support to its Instant Previews feature even though it is cautioned against using Adobe’s plugin too heavily. With support for Flash, users will be able to use a regular web browser to see a Flash-heavy, website’s animations, layout, and videos in the quick view sidebar instead of having plugin errors. The method would implement whenever a website’s details were scraped by Google’s bots but would also be turned off when the preview had to be generated on-demand.

Mac OS No Longer “Bulletproof”

InfoWorld’s Security Adviser Roger Grimes has argued that “obscurity is the greatest security defense a platform can have” and notes that Windows and Internet Explorer have been hit more successfully than Mac or Safari. Grimes notes that even when MacSweeper (malware that had targeted the Mac) was novel, the Mac OS had proven to be nearly bulletproof. Unfortunately, as many experts have predicted, Mac specific malware has become more and more common.

Google Shells Out 16K To Fix Bugs

We just got news today that Google had paid out a record $16,500 to developers in order to plug 27 Chrome Web browser vulnerabilities, and paving the way for Chrome 11’s launch. Chrome 11 includes a few perks such as speech input translation in addition to a stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. The patches were fixed after the Chromium development community members found a bunch of flaws with the latest application. 18 of these holes were rated “high”, 6 of them were rated “medium”, and three were considered low risk. Google rewarded most of the individuals for their discoveries. Google paid between $500 and $3,000 for vulnerabilities such as:

Microsoft IE10 Preview Available For Download Today

Internet Explorer 9 was released only a few weeks ago so I am surprised to see that Internet Explorer 10 Preview is already available for download. This is unlike Microsoft, they were used to releasing browsers every two years, and now it seems that they are releasing a different version every month. Microsoft must be feeling the heat from Google so it decided to up the stakes in the game with an annual release schedule for updates to its browser.

Senators Introduce A Bill That Blocks Data Sharing

Senators John McCain and John Kerry are seriously considering to introduce a bill a week from Wednesday that will limit what companies can do with online user activity and profile data. The bill will require that the sharing of user data between companies be an “opt-in” feature that users can choose if they want to share personal information about them. While this bill sounds good on paper, it will definitely limit the amount of “pool data” available which may have unforeseeable consequences on many features we rely on. I do however, like the option of opting in and hope that if the bill does get passed, people will not be too paranoid about sharing certain kinds of information.

Firefox 4 Release, No More Crashes?

Mozilla announced yesterday that they would ship the final version of Firefox 4 on Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011. The upgrade will be ready to download around 7AM PST on the same day, just eight days after Internet Explorer 9’s release. Mozilla hopes to ship a major upgrade every quarter.

Computer World explains many of Firefox 4’s features…