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Articles tagged with: judge

IE Users Angry Over Accusation Of Having Low IQ

AptiQuant is the research firm behind the survey from which they inferred that Internet Explorer users are usually dumb and have low IQ levels when compared to Chrome, Mozilla or Safari users.

This is a highly profane statement regarding IE users which have led them to a fury against the consulting company. Since the release of study results, IE users have threatened to file a law suit against the company and have sent hate mails to the company. The company performed more than 100,000 IQ tests and compiled the results on the bases of browser a user used.

Microsoft To Pay $70 M To Alcatel In Patent Ruling

The patent war is not new is US. Almost everyone is suing someone else for some goddamn reason. The patent war between Alcatel-Lucent and Microsoft is also not new. There had been a number of clashes between the two companies ever since 2002 when Alcatel sued Gateway and Dell and Microsoft jumped in to help the two companies.

According to a recent federal ruling, Microsoft is bound to pay $70 million to Alcatel-Lucent by the order of a San Diego federal judge for the patent infringement which was originally filed by engineers at AT&T in 2003. The patent dealt with data entry on computer screen without using a keyboard.

Winklevoss Twins Finally Drop Suit Against Facebook

The Winklevoss twins have finally decided to drop their long legal case with Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg, and accept the earlier $65 million settlement. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the name, Winklevoss, these twins supposedly gave Zuckerberg the ‘idea’ to create Facebook and felt that Zuckerberg stole their idea.

They have been going to court for over 7 years over Facebook, hoping to strike it rich and earn a much larger percentage of Facebook’s value. Thankfully, they have decided to drop their case and I hope, also drop their resentment towards Mark.

Apple Feels Harassed By Samsung

Just days after Nokia was declared the victor in a lawsuit that Apple started, claiming that Nokia had infringed on some of its patents, Apple is still in a dead heat with Samsung. In this lawsuit, Apple is accusing Samsung of harassment in its request to see the iPhone 5 and iPad 3 prototypes.

Apple believes that Samsung is just trying to get them back for when Apple demanded to see Samsung’s products (upcoming Galaxy) for investigation. Apple further claims that it will not reveal its prototypes as these are key company secrets that cannot risk being leaked, or even copied.

Nokia Takes Down Apple In Patent Case

Nokia has announced today that Apple has agreed to pay them a one-time settlement and continuous license fees for Nokia-owned patents, which ends a long-standing battle that Apple had started back in 2009. Both companies have also agreed to retract prior complains from the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The CEO of Nokia stated, “We are very pleased to have Apple join the growing number of Nokia licenses…This settlement demonstrates Nokia’s industry leading patent portfolio and enables us to focus on further licensing opportunities in the mobile communications market.”

Microsoft Pays $290M For Patent Infringement

The U.S. Supreme court upheld a 2009 verdict that had ordered Microsoft to pay $290 million in fines because the computer giant infringed on a patent that was owned by Toronto-based company i4i. The U.S. Supreme court found that Microsoft stole the concept of an i4i-owned patent that allowed users to manipulate the architecture and content of a document.

Microsoft altered its application in 2010 when it filed for an appeal. After the ruling, Microsoft argued that the courts should not require such a high burden of proof for patent violations because it made it hard for the larger companies to defend themselves in such cases.

Your Money Is No Longer Safe At The Bank

According to newser, hackers managed to steal over $300,000 from a client’s Ocean Bank account, but according to a Maine judge’s ruling, the bank is not responsible. The judge understood that the bank didn’t follow the best security practices, but rules that the customer should have done more to protect the account. What?! Did a judge just blame the customer for choosing to trust a bank with his money?

The hackers got access to Patco Construction (the victims) Company’s banking credentials by sending a malicious e-mail to employees and then installing a password-stealing Trojan.

Man Gets His Laptop Back, Thanks To Twitter

An Oakland man had his laptop stolen in March of this year, and three months later, finally got his property back. Did it take three months to find the thief? Nope, it took less than 24 hours. Here’s what happened: The victim, Joshua Kaufman had his laptop stolen soon after he had installed theft-tracking software.

The software did its job just right and sent pictures of the thief, but when Kaufman went the police with the pictures, the Oakland police weren’t too concerned, even when Kaufman was able to tell the exact whereabouts of the man who stole his laptop.

He followed up with the investigator a month later, and still nothing. He contacted the Oakland Police Department twice via e-mail, and he hadn’t heard back. So what’s a guy to do?

Sony’s Last Words Before Court Hearing

CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment, Kazuo Hirai offered an explanation for the Sony attacks less than a week before Sony’s June 2nd court date. Hirai undoubtedly pins the attacks to the Anonymous group who made a number of threats against Sony, immediately after Sony decided to pursue George Hotz for teaching others how to pirate. Let me also remind you that a file was found deep in Sony’s network that carried the slogan of the Anonymous group, “We are Legion” and the file was called “Anonymous.” Assuming Anonymous isn’t being framed by some rival hacking group (if there is one), all fingers point to them.

Huge Security Hole Found In Many Nikon Cameras

Researchers have recently discovered a flaw in the system used by Nikon professional digital cameras, the same system that ensures that images have not been tampered with. What usually happens in high-end SLR digital cameras is a unique and encrypted signing key is assigned to an image when it is shot. This image is then verified by Nikon’s proprietary Image Authentication System. When an image gets edited, this key is overwritten, and the software does this automatically.