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Articles tagged with: legal system

US Supreme Court Rejects Ban On Violent Games

The US Supreme court has recently rejected the 2005 California law that banned the sale or rental of violent video games to anyone under age 18. Now, parents could still purchase these violent games for their children, but any store caught selling the game to a minor could face a fine up to $1,000.

The court ruled against the ban 7-2, in accordance with the free speech rights found in the US constitution. Contrary to some beliefs that violent video games pose a bad influence on young children, the courts upheld that they did not want to filter what children are exposed to and essentially left that duty up to the parents or caretakers of the child.

Microsoft Pays $290M For Patent Infringement

The U.S. Supreme court upheld a 2009 verdict that had ordered Microsoft to pay $290 million in fines because the computer giant infringed on a patent that was owned by Toronto-based company i4i. The U.S. Supreme court found that Microsoft stole the concept of an i4i-owned patent that allowed users to manipulate the architecture and content of a document.

Microsoft altered its application in 2010 when it filed for an appeal. After the ruling, Microsoft argued that the courts should not require such a high burden of proof for patent violations because it made it hard for the larger companies to defend themselves in such cases.

Sony’s Last Words Before Court Hearing

CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment, Kazuo Hirai offered an explanation for the Sony attacks less than a week before Sony’s June 2nd court date. Hirai undoubtedly pins the attacks to the Anonymous group who made a number of threats against Sony, immediately after Sony decided to pursue George Hotz for teaching others how to pirate. Let me also remind you that a file was found deep in Sony’s network that carried the slogan of the Anonymous group, “We are Legion” and the file was called “Anonymous.” Assuming Anonymous isn’t being framed by some rival hacking group (if there is one), all fingers point to them.