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Articles tagged with: netbooks

Toshiba Introduces New L700 And C600 Laptops

Toshiba has just revamped its Satellite L700 and C600 Series laptops, starting at $380, you’ll certainly be interested in these 15.6″ laptops, powered by AMD.

For the low price, the notebooks start out with an AMD single-core E-240 processor with AMD Radeon HD 6310 graphics. To make up for the slow processor, Toshiba is packing 3GB of DDR3 memory clocked in at 1066MHz and 250GB of hard drive space to store your files.

AMD Announces G-Series APU

AMD has just announced its new G-series platform, the world’s first combination of a lower-power CPU, coupled with an advanced GPU that is integrated into a single embedded Accelerated Processing Unit. The G-series has the core focus of producing more for less power.

These APUs carry thermal design power ratings between 5.5 and 6.4 watts, leading to a 39% power savings compared to previous versions.

The G-series APU ships in a 361mm2 package that allows compact use, perfect for modern netbooks and notebooks. AMD claims that the new G-series APUs offer up to three times the performance per watt compared to previous generations.

Toshiba Gears Up For Massive OLED Production

Toshiba introduced the OLED as the most portable and most flexible screen, measuring at a size of 0.1mm and weighing in at just a gram. OLED was and is the first flexible screen introduced by Toshiba, as it utilizes an oxide semiconductor TFT, the OLED is composed of a plastic substrate at a temperature of 200 Celsius.

Next Generation Atom Netbooks

The Atom N2600 hitting computers nationwide will be clocked at 1.6GHz and use only 3.5 watts of power. The new chip will come with an integrated graphics chipset of GMA 5600 graphics clocked at 400MHz. The RAM will be limited to 2GB of DDR3-800 and support netbook screen sizes between 7-10.2 inches, 4-6 batteries, 32GB SSDs up to 250GB HDDs, and will be priced no more than $329.

Future netbooks with the upgraded Atom N2800 will clock in at 1.86GHz, use 6.5 watts of power, have a GMA 5650 integrated graphics chipset clocked at 640MHz and support up to 4GB of DDR3 RAM, clocked at 1066MHz. The latter cpu will support netbook and laptop screens as large as 12.1-inches with prices greater than $329.

Corsair Delivers Fast Force Series 3 SSDs

Solid-state technology is great because the drives use solid-state memory to store persistent data on the disk, allowing for much quicker access to user files. Also, rather than using a rotating disk found in traditional hard disk drives, solid-state drives do not have any such spinning disk, allowing the occasional bump on the road to not affect the drive’s data.

As you may guess, solid-state drives are a bit more useful for portable gadgets like laptops and netbooks because those are devices that actually move around and are more susceptible to drops and bumps than the desktop computer that sits by your desk all day.

Chrome OS; Superior To Windows 7?

Google co-founder Sergey Brin made some interesting points at the Google I/O conference. Brin states some reasons on why he and co-founder Larry Page decided to create an operating system. Brin claims that Windows is “too much of a hassle to use” and maintain, offering the company’s new Chrome operating system as a solution to consumers’ problems. Although Brin noted that Windows 7 has got some great security features, he believes that the complexity of maintaining a computer tortures its users.

Intel Working On 22nm Atom Silvermont

According to CNET, Intel is designing a 22 nanometer Atom chip with its new 3D transistors. The chip is codenamed Silvermont and is touted to boost performance by 37% while reducing power consumption by 50% over current 32nm chips. While CNET was unable to get hard numbers to back up the new Atom chip, I can assure that it will be a vast upgrade to current chips. These new atom chips will most likely be the driving force in future tablets, netbooks, and possibly smaller notebooks (those smaller than 12 inches).

Google Teaches Computers How To Regret

What makes the human brain fascinating is our ability to learn from everyday experiences and have the option to better ourselves. Due to the organic nature of the brain, our brains constantly re-wire and prune unused neural connections in effort to keep cognitive functions that are truly necessary for our everyday use while “losing” neural circuits we no longer need. This is exactly what is happening at a neurological level when we find ourselves “rusty” in a language we haven’t used in years. Our brains assume we no longer have use for the language due to lack of use, and it prunes those connections it deems unnecessary to “make room” for more relevant stuff.

The human brain also experiences the emotion of regret because the act of regretting welcomes reflection on what we should have done in a particular situation. By feeling regret, we are able to perhaps make a better decision the next time we are faced in a similar situation. What about computers, will they ever be able to function on a human level? Google is interested in answering that question.