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Articles tagged with: professor

3 Students Drop Out To Create Academic Software

TechCrunch reports that three students from the University of Pennsylvania have recently quit school to pursue their own startup. The product? CourseKit, an online platform that will allow professors to better manage their classes, and it works similar to the current course management software, Blackboard.

Having graduated University within the past year, I have used Blackboard and while slightly disorganized, I’ve found it to be ‘useful’ enough to grab documents, download my syllabi, and get the homework readings. I mean, who needs anything more? Just get the assignments, page readings, and begin to hit the books, right?

Adobe Enhances Learning Software

Adobe has just released an update to its current eLearning Suite platform. If you haven’t yet heard of eLearning suite, it’s basically a collection of tools that are used to make educational content for academic and professional purposes. The updated version 2.5 of the eLearning platform includes: a focus on creating more streamlined workflows, more output options, and is more user friendly.

Adobe is also allowing customers license the eLearning Suite through a monthly or yearly subscription (as it is doing for its photo editing software).

Google Teaches Computers How To Regret

What makes the human brain fascinating is our ability to learn from everyday experiences and have the option to better ourselves. Due to the organic nature of the brain, our brains constantly re-wire and prune unused neural connections in effort to keep cognitive functions that are truly necessary for our everyday use while “losing” neural circuits we no longer need. This is exactly what is happening at a neurological level when we find ourselves “rusty” in a language we haven’t used in years. Our brains assume we no longer have use for the language due to lack of use, and it prunes those connections it deems unnecessary to “make room” for more relevant stuff.

The human brain also experiences the emotion of regret because the act of regretting welcomes reflection on what we should have done in a particular situation. By feeling regret, we are able to perhaps make a better decision the next time we are faced in a similar situation. What about computers, will they ever be able to function on a human level? Google is interested in answering that question.