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Articles tagged with: project

Cool Eye Wear Gadget MEG4.0

After the great success of Google’s Project Glass eyewear, revealed earlier this year, Olympus has this week brought out a new display eyewear prototype named the MEG4.0.

The Olympus MEG4.0 is manufactured in such a way that it connects with our daily usage devices through Bluetooth and is also integrated with Olympus’s in-house “proprietary optical technology”.

Twitter Redevelops The Web Page For iPad

Looks like to many social networking websites, iPad is a thing they sure have to adapt to. With a brand name like Apple, it’s no wonder they get all the street cred.

Although there had been applications for using both Twitter and Facebook on the iPad, neither of these social networking behemoths were satisfied with their performance. Therefore, Facebook started Project Spartan, an effort to develop a separate HTML5 based Facebook page for the iPad.

Watch Out! Google+ Circles Is Getting Even Better!

Google+ circles is an adorable feature for privacy concerned folks allowing others only to see what they want them to. Now the latest buzz is that this feature is getting even better.

Fridge is a web-suite which provided the facility of creating separate groups for friends, sharing stuff and planning events much alike other social networking sites. But the new thing is, Google is procuring Fridge.

Google Teaches Computers How To Regret

What makes the human brain fascinating is our ability to learn from everyday experiences and have the option to better ourselves. Due to the organic nature of the brain, our brains constantly re-wire and prune unused neural connections in effort to keep cognitive functions that are truly necessary for our everyday use while “losing” neural circuits we no longer need. This is exactly what is happening at a neurological level when we find ourselves “rusty” in a language we haven’t used in years. Our brains assume we no longer have use for the language due to lack of use, and it prunes those connections it deems unnecessary to “make room” for more relevant stuff.

The human brain also experiences the emotion of regret because the act of regretting welcomes reflection on what we should have done in a particular situation. By feeling regret, we are able to perhaps make a better decision the next time we are faced in a similar situation. What about computers, will they ever be able to function on a human level? Google is interested in answering that question.