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Articles tagged with: radio

SiriusXM Revamps Entire System To Stay Competitive

SiriusXM satellite radio will soon offer personal radio channels, kinda like what Pandora has got going on for them. I guess SiriusXM thought it was time to change the way they operate if they plan on remaining a player in the audio space.

SiriusXM’s new radio channels will be able to replay, skip, and ban songs, as well as some on-demand features. You’ll also be able to use it on your TiVo which might make the hefty monthly packages a bit more reasonable.

Pandora’s New Layout Came When It Was Supposed To

Pandora’s new layout is a welcome change for me, primarily because it is based on HTML5. With the previous version of Pandora, my 32-bit Firefox browser would often crash on my 64-bit operating system due to the flash player.

Since, I no longer use Firefox, it hasn’t been a problem with good ol’ trusty Chrome, but it’s still nice to know that Firefox will be safe.

A $30 Alternative To An iPod

These days, one can find a number of ways to enjoy his music. He can listen on his trendy new iPod nano or stream from his smartphone, for example. Even though iPod nano’s are a bit costly for what you get, there might be a solution to your woes. How would you like a device which is of iPod nano’s size but it is a music player, an e-reader and a watch, all-in-one?

This cool watch-o-music player is called Timesnap. The gadget can be tied on your wrist. It’s basic feature is playing MP3 and MP4 music. The Timesnap has a large storage of 4GB which can be extended by an SD memory card up to 8GB. And to your amazement, it is also an e-reader (you might need a magnifying lens to read from such a tiny display). And of course, it’s also a watch.

Pandora Gets A Whole New Look, Switches To HTML5

If you’re into online radio, you’ve probably heard of Pandora. The company had an initial public offering just a few weeks ago, and are now going through a massive restructure that will unveil itself very soon.

To start, subscribers will be slowly but steadily gaining access to the new site on a rolling basis, so it’s hard to give an exact launch date of Pandora’s new interface. The site will first be available to Pandora One customers.

Spotify Comes To U.S. Residents, Perhaps For A Facebook Debut?

Spotify, a Swedish DRM-based music streaming service includes both major labels such as Sony, EMI, and Universal, and independent labels. The startup was launched in October of 2008, and I am please to announce that the service will soon be available to U.S. customers.

The announcement was actually made earlier in the month when Spotify had confirmed that it would come to the U.S., although it had not provided a specific launch date.

Slacker Radio Launches With Hopeful Future

Slacker has just launched its premium online radio service, giving users unlimited song skips without any ads for just $4 a month, as part of its existing Radio Plus service. If you do the math, that’s just $12 more per year than Pandora, which only allows you 6 song skips per station per hour (the hour is real-time, not time spent on Pandora). What’s new is for $10 a month, users can play any song in Slacker’s music library whenever they’d like.

Let This Gadget Find Music For You, For Free

What I am about to say is no secret, we live very busy lives. Although there are excellent Internet radio solutions like Pandora out there, people will notice that they are often bound to a particular channel, not literally of course. It is just that when you are hard at work, it’s not very feasible to “play DJ” and switch back and forth through particular channels on a platform such as Pandora. The new RM50 is an Internet Radio that brings a modern influence to a traditional FM radio. For about $160, you’ll be able to access a multitude of music stations, news stations, local, and specialist radio stations.

View WiFi Signals In Terms Of White Light (Video Proof)

Norway design researchers are working on displaying the material and spatial qualities of WiFi networks through light, demonstrating signal strength in long-exposure photographs. The researchers have built a tall wooden probe, measuring four meters high, a WiFi module, and used 80 LEDS.

The 80 LEDs run a length that pulses and raises based on the strength of a specified WiFi network. After three weeks of hard work in Oslo, Norway, the pulsing lights have created a physical representation of the invisible world of WiFi networks.