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Articles tagged with: SATA III

Go Full Speed With Corsair Force GT SSD

While 2.5″ hard disk drives are certainly small, they aren’t always the fastest out of the bunch. If you’re looking for real speed and increased data dependability, you might want to look into solid state drives. The new Corsair Force GT is a SATA III drive that offers 550Mbps read and 5xx write speeds.

It even comes in an unusual red coating, which makes it stand out in comparison to similar drives. Although fast, the drives do not come cheap as solid-state technology remains to be ‘the latest & greatest’ in storage media.

Buffalo’s Powerful 512GB SATA III SSD

Buffalo has just rolled out a brand new 512GB SATA III solid state drive this week, set to launch in the Japanese market. The SSD-N512S/MC400 is capable of read speeds up to 405MB per second. The company is also set to launch a 256GB version of the SSD called the SSD-N256S/MC400.

The 256GB version will be priced just under $900 USD, with the 512GB version around $1,600. No word yet on whether or not there will be availability, worldwide, but do realize that these are state-of-the-art (pun intended), solid state drives.

SanDisk Kicks Off 100-Series SSDs

Don’t think that Computex is a show only about computers. SanDisk proved otherwise when the company introduced a few flash-based storage solutions, designed for mobile devices and ultraportable laptops. First up, we’ve got the SanDisk U100, a SATA III card that gives thin and light notebooks a run for their money (closer speeds to desktop SSDs)! These new SATA III cards can read/write at speeds of up to 450MB/s and 340MB/s, respectively.

Corsair Delivers Fast Force Series 3 SSDs

Solid-state technology is great because the drives use solid-state memory to store persistent data on the disk, allowing for much quicker access to user files. Also, rather than using a rotating disk found in traditional hard disk drives, solid-state drives do not have any such spinning disk, allowing the occasional bump on the road to not affect the drive’s data.

As you may guess, solid-state drives are a bit more useful for portable gadgets like laptops and netbooks because those are devices that actually move around and are more susceptible to drops and bumps than the desktop computer that sits by your desk all day.