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Articles tagged with: solid state drive

OCZ Announces Razer Fast SSD @ 2800MB/s

OCZ has recently shown off their latest Z-Drive R4 PCIe SSD, capable of transferring a whopping 2800MB/s of data and competing 500K IOPS. The new drive is optimal for cloud computing and enterprise data applications.

You can get the card in two configurations; a half height card designed for tight spaces, and a full height card that is perfect for those larger multi-node rackmount servers.

Both cards support SLC (single level cell) or MLC (multi level cell) NAND flash. If you are looking for sheer speed, you’re going to want this solid-state drive.

IBM Announces Phase Change Memory- 100x More Efficient

IBM announced today a special breakthrough in computer memory tech that may lead to solid state drives being able to store as much as NAND flash technology but work at a speed of 100x faster than current clock speeds, and have a much longer lifespan.

The technology is based on phase-change memory chips that store two bits of data per cell, forgoing corruption problems (a previous setback in PCM technology).

Super Talent’s USB 3.0 Express RC8: A SSD In Disguise

Did you ever want to own a USB flash drive that could potentially achieve 270MB/s reads and 240MB/s writes? If you do, then it looks like Super Talent’s USB 3.0 Express RC8 could just be the device you’re looking for.

The flash drive is powered by the SandForce SSD processor which brings several features to the flash drive that is typically found only on first tier SSD products.

New Cloudbox From Lacie Keeps Your Data Safe

LaCie now has a new cloud storage system called the CloudBox that is essentially a hard drive that backs up your files both locally and wireless to a cloud-based platform. When it comes to data protection, you’re always going to want to have a backup in case there are technical difficulties over the cloud (on the web).

For $200 a year, users will get 100GB of cloud data storage. The device itself costs $200 and the first year of storage is free. Users can then opt to either renew the contract or drop the cloud service.

Check Out The SanDisk 800GB Lightning SSD

In the world of technology, hardware continues to shrink in size while double in capacity. SanDisk has just launched two new Lightning ranges of solid state drives with capacities that range from 100GB all the way up to 800GB.

The SanDisk Lightning drives ranges include three SLC flash drives with capacities of 100GB, 200GB, and 400GB. The 200GB, 400GB, and 800GB have three MLC (multi-level cell) flash drives. There is also a 2.5″ and 3.5″ standard form factor that has been designed to integrate with current SAS enterprise storage and server systems.

Intel 710 + 720 SSDs Get Leaked

We have just got word of the leaked enterprise solid state drives from Intel. The Intel 710 “Lyndonville” and the Intel 720 “Ramsdale” are now in the spotlight. The 710 has 25nm HET MLC, a more durable form of MLC (multi-level cell). The 710 comes in a number of capacities, 100GB, 200GB, and 300GB, claiming to have read and write speeds of 270MB/s over 210MB/s, running on a solid 3Gbps SATA connection.

The 720 comes on 34nm SLC (single-level cell) chips, and comprises a 200GB and 400GB capacity. The speeds it carries are read/write of up to 2200MB/s over 1800MB/s, which may be a typo from the leaked roadmap or the majority of solid-state drives will drastically go down in price.

New CAM Storage Is Much Faster Than Any SSD

Before solid-state drives came around, data storage on PCs happened at a relatively slow pace using traditional hard disk drives which utilize a spinning disk between 3,800 RPM (less common) to 7,200 RPM (more common). Although solid state technology is faster and more reliable than hard drives, it’s still nothing compared to the speed of RAM (Random Access Memory).

With this in mind, NEC developed a new Content Addressable Memory (CAM) system that stores data without using any power. The new CAM modules are as fast as RAM modules, making it a top contender for future technology around the globe.

Corsair Recalls 120GB Force Series 3 SSD

It looks like Corsair may have sold a bad egg, or even a whole batch of them, with the 120GB Corsair Force Series solid state drives. Corsair claims that a “significant percentage” of these drives do not perform to specifications.

Corsair claimed that it analyzed issues associated with the stability of the recently released drive and requests that users stop using them immediately, even if there are no signs of strange behavior. Fortunately, the problem only affects the 120GB version with the part number CSSD-F120GB3-BK, and all other drives in the Force and Force GT families are unaffected.

Gigabyte’s New Motherboard Features 240GB Integrated SSD

Just a week ago, we blogged about the Gigabyte motherboard with the integrated 20GB SSD. Glenn Barber spoke about how he thought it was cool to have 20GB of space on the motherboard so that users could easily reformat without re-installing the operating system each time.

I have to admit that even I thought that was a cool new feature at the time, until the Computex 2011 show when I heard that Gigabyte will also be releasing motherboards with 60GB, 120GB, and 240GB of *integrated on-board SSD, providing a max read/write of 140MB/s and 90MB/s, respectively.

Buffalo’s Powerful 512GB SATA III SSD

Buffalo has just rolled out a brand new 512GB SATA III solid state drive this week, set to launch in the Japanese market. The SSD-N512S/MC400 is capable of read speeds up to 405MB per second. The company is also set to launch a 256GB version of the SSD called the SSD-N256S/MC400.

The 256GB version will be priced just under $900 USD, with the 512GB version around $1,600. No word yet on whether or not there will be availability, worldwide, but do realize that these are state-of-the-art (pun intended), solid state drives.